Zobo ( A brief introduction and how Zobo is made)

Zobo is made from the the dried  calyces (sepal)  of the hibiscus plant flower. Zobo leaves are also called; sorrel, flor de Jamaica and rosemallow. Although the drink is  known by different names all over the world (Zobo, Hibiscus tea, bissap, wonjo), the flavor profile is very similar, the drink usually has a tangy flavor profile.

Nutrition Profile:

“100 g of hibiscus fruit contains 49 calories, 12.3 g of carbohydrates with 2.3 occurring as dietary fiber, 1.9 g of protein, 14 mg of vitamin C, 300 mg of beta carotene, 57 mg of phosphorus, 2.9 mg of iron and 1.7 mg of calcium”

Health Benefits:

Zobo contains 15-30% organic acids, including citric acid, maleic acid, and tartaric acid. It also contains acidic polysaccharides and flavonoid glycosides, such as cyanidin and delphinine.

The tea is popular as a natural diuretic and is used traditionally as a mild medicine. Dieters and people with kidney problems often take it without adding sugar for its beneficial properties and as a natural diuretic. A 2008 USDA study shows consuming hibiscus tea lowers blood pressure in a group of prehypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults


Recipe for Zobo ( Hibiscus tea)


  • 1 cup dried Hibiscus Sepal ( Zobo Leaves)
  • 4 cups boiling water
  • Juice of one lemon
  • Sugar to taste



  1. Set the leaves in a large bowl, cover with boiled water. Set aside for 2-4 hours (this will allow the drink to steep)
  2. Pour the drink through a sieve or strainer to separate the fluid from the leaves
  3. Add some ice, lemon juice and sugar to taste.  Combine.


Note: The drink can be served hot or cold.  Also, the amount of water used is based on preference, you can adjust the water down or up.  Also experiment with food flavors like Pineapple, vanilla and berries for some diversity.

PS: The drink stains easily, be mindful when handling it.