Kaun / Akaun (Cooking Potash)


potash in Nigerian food

Kaun / Akaun Nigerian Cooking Potash

Why use Kaun/ Potash in Nigerian food

Akaun is added to soups, legumes, meat and sauces usually for three reasons: to increase Viscosity in soups like Okra and Ewedu (jute) ,  to faster tenderize tough cuts of meat and legumes and or to colloid oil and water.


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By |June 27th, 2012|31 Comments

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31 Comments

  1. Connie March 28, 2016 at 12:45 pm - Reply

    Where can I buy this potash in the US?

  2. Um you're wrong. December 21, 2015 at 8:42 am - Reply

    Potash is most definitely different than baking soda. Potash is potassium, and frankly I don’t think you know what your talking about.

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie December 22, 2015 at 1:43 pm - Reply

      Do you know how to read? where in this post do you see anything about potash being the same as baking soda? baking soda as a substitute for potash – absolutely. We never claimed they were the same, learn to read please.

  3. ayodele oluwatoyin Joseph November 6, 2015 at 9:35 am - Reply

    A pinch of potash in the water for semolina makes it really come out very nice

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie November 8, 2015 at 12:00 pm - Reply

      wow! that is definitely new, I will have to try it.

  4. Toyo June 16, 2015 at 7:02 am - Reply

    Where can you get baking potash in the UK, this is different to bicarbonate of soda?

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie June 16, 2015 at 9:58 pm - Reply

      It’s the same as bicarbonate of soda. you will find it in the baking isle of major grocery stores.

  5. O. Abegha June 16, 2015 at 12:32 am - Reply

    Is baking Soda good for yam pottage?

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie June 16, 2015 at 9:57 pm - Reply

      Why would you need baking soda in yam pottage?

  6. kaechy oranefo June 4, 2015 at 11:40 pm - Reply

    pls is this potash same as the one which is used as fertilizer

  7. Rosa October 10, 2013 at 6:26 pm - Reply

    Too much of anything is Bad for you. Therefore use your akaun, ie potash sparingly, even baking soda.

  8. Rosa October 10, 2013 at 6:24 pm - Reply

    Too much of anything is Bad for you. Therefore use you akaun, ie potash sparingly, even baking soda.

  9. Anonymous September 23, 2013 at 4:41 am - Reply

    The baking soda does work. Zimbabweans use it as well for cooking okra

  10. Anonymous September 17, 2013 at 1:49 am - Reply

    Comment…I n’t think is good to the body

  11. Nitana August 19, 2013 at 4:54 pm - Reply

    How I miss Ovo with dry fish and boiled yam on Saturday mornings..

  12. Kemi Oluboro June 16, 2013 at 3:36 pm - Reply

    Baking soda is good though but it destroys the nutrients in veges and leaves you with only the fiber.

  13. Nkemoma. December 26, 2012 at 10:39 am - Reply

    Is it advisable to eat food prepared with potash (kaun) in pregnancy most especially ‘owo’ by d Edos’.

  14. rochelle November 1, 2012 at 3:36 pm - Reply

    very veryyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy GOODDDDDDDDDDDDDDd

  15. Name October 8, 2012 at 8:15 am - Reply

    my gyn says it is not good for pregnant women as it contracts the womb

  16. iphy September 15, 2012 at 2:43 am - Reply

    Is it tru dat potash affects sperm cells in men?

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie September 16, 2012 at 3:26 pm - Reply

      I am not certain, I think you should ask your DR.

    • Ochuko January 27, 2016 at 3:43 am - Reply

      It causes testicular injury and affects sperm production, thus definitely affecting the sperm physiology. I am a research scientist and personally carried out the studies. Even we tried treating with local spices, it worsened the effect. It therefore implies the injury is irreversible. However, we didn’t find any effect on other organs. Men should therefore limit its intake. The research work will soon be published in a scientific journal.

      • 9jafoodie
        9jafoodie January 31, 2016 at 7:52 pm - Reply

        looking forward to seeing your research paper.

  17. Oaeddy September 3, 2012 at 10:16 am - Reply

    There is a soup we make called Ovo in Edo state. I wonder if I can use Baking soda instead of kaun to make it.

  18. Jemima July 4, 2012 at 9:14 am - Reply

    My mother in law is Togolese, she taught me to use baking soda instead of kaun for Okro and ewedu, that’s how its done in Togo, you just add a tsp at the most, i definitely prefer it

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie July 4, 2012 at 6:42 pm - Reply

      This is interesting! I will definitely try Baking soda.

  19. Name July 4, 2012 at 9:13 am - Reply

    My mother in law is Togolese, she taught me to use baking soda instead of kaun for Okro and ewedu, that’s how its done in Togo, you just add a tsp at the most, i definitely prefer it

  20. Myne Whitman June 28, 2012 at 9:21 pm - Reply

    It’s really very useful for beans.

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