Afia Efere (White Soup)


efik - white - soup - spices - nigerian
Afia Efere (white soup)
 My love affair with white soup started when I met my friend Flo in college, she made me a bowl of Efere with amazing chicken and I was sold forever. Fast forward to now, I am married to an Ibibio man and this is a staple in our home. Afia Efere translate directly to white soup, it’s so named due to the peculiar white color of the soup. The color is due to the thickener use (pounded yam) and the absence of palm oil which is prevalent in Nigerian Soups.
The beauty of this soup is in it simplicity; on the simplest level, efere  is a earthy broth usually made from goat meat or fresh fish and seasoned with Uyayak pod (aidan fruit ), crayfish powder and Uda pod (negro pepper). Efere is also very similar to Ofe Nsala from Easter Nigeria, however, nsala contains Utazi and ogiri and doesn’t contain uda or uyayak.
Whatever your tribe or origin, this soup should be on your roster, it’s deliciously simple and fragrant and pairs excellently well with pounded yam.
Ingredient
  • Uyayak Pod (Aidan Fruit) – 1 inch
  • Uda pods- 2 (seeds removed and discarded)
  • Goat meat, smoked fish and or chicken (precooked) ~600g
  • 2 cubes Maggi
  • ¼ cup crayfish powder
  • Salt – to taste
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper (hot pepper – ata Rodo) (optional)
  • Pounded yam paste (1/4 cup) (substitute 1/2 cup yam powder)*
*To make pounded yam paste – boil 200g of yam in some water until yam is very soft. Remove yam pieces from water and place in a mortal or food processor. process until a smooth paste forms.
Direction
  • Place the uyayk and uda pod on an oven tray – toast at 525f for 5 minutes or until just smoky

Uyaya - uda - pod

  • In a large pot – combine goat meat, chicken, pepper, blended crayfish, salt, maggi, uyayak, uda and smoked fish. Add enough water to just cover the ingredients.  Stir to combine. Set on high heat and bring to a rolling boil. reduce heat to medium-low and leave to simmer for 25 – 30 minutes

efere - efik - white - soup

  • If using yam powder – combine with enough water to form a smooth paste

Pounded yam paste - soup

  • Add in yam or pounded yam into the broth. Stir well until paste is loose and thorough combined with the broth.  Simmer uncovered for another 4 – 5 minutes

Cooking efere afia soup

Remove and discard Uyayk and uda pods to serve. Enjoy with pounded yam
Afia Efere - White - soup - Nigeria


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Lose It Nigerian

By |October 4th, 2013|36 Comments

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36 Comments

  1. Aggy December 16, 2016 at 12:27 am - Reply

    Thank you for this wonderful receipe. you have made by weekend.

  2. monica September 10, 2016 at 11:36 am - Reply

    Hummm I finally got the famous uyayak . Soup ready to go. Muaaaah Ronke. Like my niece would say “I laud you”

  3. Jacky January 30, 2016 at 12:46 pm - Reply

    Ronke, thanks for a fabulous website like this. I have been searching for years for a similar site that encourages us Nigerians abroad to live healthier lives. Beautiful pictures and very informative. Keep it up.

  4. Frida January 13, 2016 at 7:43 am - Reply

    Lovely one, I have to try it in ur own way. Thanks

  5. pat May 21, 2015 at 7:58 am - Reply

    Hi nice one,but I have tried it before seeing ur post, for the uyàyàk do I have to remove the seeds before I use

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie May 24, 2015 at 12:01 pm - Reply

      It’s not necessary to remove the seeds, as long as they stay inside the pod it’s okay.

  6. kukei umoye February 23, 2015 at 3:59 am - Reply

    for those trying to eat health u can use oatmeal powder to thicken d soup instead f poundo.. i do the same with bitter leaf soup or ofe onugbu.. very nice too

  7. Chy August 29, 2014 at 10:12 pm - Reply

    Any substitute for uyayak?

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie August 30, 2014 at 3:18 pm - Reply

      unfortunately not but you can cook the soup without.

  8. may khalil July 25, 2014 at 11:24 am - Reply

    What is uyayak for those of us not akwa ibom or calabar

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie July 26, 2014 at 3:02 pm - Reply

      It’s called Aidan fruit in English. I will add a picture.

  9. oby July 19, 2014 at 10:04 pm - Reply

    thats my mama’s fever medicine, we children in those days dey form fever becos we want ofe nsala. men!, i wish i have the spices, i will replicate this now now

  10. Aviky June 8, 2014 at 6:46 am - Reply

    Thanks for this. Trying it out today *fingers crossed* one more thing I’ll be using poundo yam… All I need to do is add a little poundo yam flour right?

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie June 18, 2014 at 6:17 pm - Reply

      Yes!!! you might want to dissolve the flour in a little bit of water first to make a paste.

  11. Joxy December 19, 2013 at 12:27 pm - Reply

    So I tried out this recipe, using poundo paste instead of pounded yam. It absolutely rocked, was very tasty. I wanted to add uyayak, but didn’t have any, or so I thought. I did have yanghanyaghan, which I later discovered was the same thing, courtesy of Google. Great recipe, easy to follow. Thank you.

  12. Joxy December 10, 2013 at 2:12 pm - Reply

    Any substitute for pounded yam paste? Poundo?

  13. lizzy November 29, 2013 at 11:05 am - Reply

    Hello,u are really doing a great job,kudos to u all.My question is,wat do u mean by pounded yam paste

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie December 1, 2013 at 9:49 am - Reply

      it’s the initial result from pounding yam, just before it becomes stretchy

  14. ATOB November 22, 2013 at 6:52 am - Reply

    Please when can you add uyayak to it.

    • 9jafoodie
      9jafoodie November 22, 2013 at 5:25 pm - Reply

      Same time as the meat…. just remember to remove it when you are done.

  15. Mstizzle November 5, 2013 at 10:03 pm - Reply

    Seems easy enough for me to try.

  16. msE October 20, 2013 at 5:12 am - Reply

    EtukFryde  it’s called uyayak in ibibio, i think

  17. EtukFryde October 16, 2013 at 8:30 am - Reply

    Actually there is a particular spice not listed for this. I’m not exactly sure what the native name is or if it even has an English name but it looks like the bark of a tree with a cross like shape when split in two. Well the efik people use it anyways

  18. Sisiekomi October 12, 2013 at 4:42 pm - Reply

    When I first came across the recipe for this soup I wasn’t too sure I wanted to try it out. But when I eventually did, it was awesome. Nice recipe.

  19. Anonymous October 12, 2013 at 4:41 pm - Reply

    When I first came across the recipe for this soup I wasn’t too sure I wanted to try it out. But when I eventually did, it was awesome. Nice recipe.

  20. Laura October 6, 2013 at 7:13 am - Reply

    I’m absolutely loving this soup as no oil required. As u may know, Nigerian dishes can be cramped with palm oil, which I’ve just had enough of. More recipes like this would be much appreciated. Thanks

  21. Anonymous October 6, 2013 at 7:12 am - Reply

    I’m absolutely loving this soup as no oil required. As u may know, Nigerian dishes can be cramped with palm oil, which I’ve just had enough of. More recipes like this would be much appreciated. Thanks

  22. Anonymous October 5, 2013 at 3:17 pm - Reply

    Mmnhh! Looks yummy. I grew up with this soup, so I could practically taste the soup I saw in the picture! Well done and keep it up!

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